And some more horror stories

By Alphia Abdikeeva, CIDH ProIgual

Upon recently reading the piece How Many More Horror Stories Do We Need to Hear and watching the clip that accompanies it, I felt big, walnut-sized goosebumps on the skin. A good Spanish word “escalofriante” describes well the emotion.

The article was written by Judith Klein, a long-time colleague and friend of mine. She directs the Mental Health Initiative (MHI) program at Open Society Institute, the program that for years has been advocating for deinstitutionalization of people with mental disabilities and providing community-based services that allow their integration in society.

I personally learned about the issue of rampant institutionalization and abuse of human rights of people with mental disabilities just a few years ago, when the report on cagebeds by Mental Disability Advocacy Center (MDAC) came out.

At that time I honestly thought that following the damning MDAC publication things would change immediately, because it was a national embarrassment for each and every country involved. Since it was news to me and that was my human reaction, I really believed that everyone who just learned about the cagebeds for the first time would also react this way. Especially people in power — they tend to be cockiest about their country´s reputation.

Apparently not. Apparently bureaucrats already know all about it, but continue maintaining and financing establishments where atrocities like cagebeds are possible. And so we continue hearing horror stories of institutional abuse of people with mental disabilities.

There are many vulnerable groups out there: women; refugees; elderly; prison inmates; marginalized ethnic, religious or sexual minorities. Sometimes, when the proverbial  last straw breaks their back, so-to-say, they at least can collectively protest or riot to get attention to their plight and to negotiate improvements in their condition. But institutional inmates with mental disabilities do not even have this last resort.

Unfortunately, my guess is there will be many, many more horror stories to come. But I think, no matter how disturbing, they should keep coming to light. Somebody has got to stir up public and bureaucratic feelings. So that if not out of elementary human compassion, then at least out of professional embarrassment — and possible sanctions — people in a position to do something about deinstitutionalization would act.